7 Tips That Will Reshape Your Financial Future

7 Tips That Will Reshape Your Financial Future

Entrepreneurship

I’ve had a lot of financial ups and downs.

I attended (podiatric) medical school, then PA school, and racked up a ton of debt.   

I’ve worked as a PA, purchased a home, and started my own business.

It’s been an interesting ride and has given me quite a lot of experience to draw upon.

Today I’m going to share my best tips for financial success, based on my own experience.  

Limit your debt as much as possible

After college, I attended a podiatric medical school. After a few years of that, I had a change of heart and decided to become a PA instead.

The problem?

Medical programs are extremely expensive, and I racked up several hundred thousand dollars in debt.   

To be honest, I didn’t realize how much of a burden that debt was going to be. Like a lot of people, I was naive. And all that student loan debt has been a huge burden over the past several years. 

So here’s my best advice:

Plan ahead, and try to avoid debt as much as you possibly can. Take it from me – that will make your life much, much easier.

Look for a modest home, not a mansion.

So many people buy homes that are bigger than they need, leading to really high monthly mortgage expenses. Often thousands of dollars per month.

When I started looking at homes a few years ago, I was in the 200-300K range at first. After a while, I realized I could get a condo (with about the same square footage) for less than half the cost.

As a result, my monthly mortgage expense is quite low, less than $500.

Compare that to some of my friends who pay $1,500, $2,000, or even more per month. That’s an extra $1,000+ I can save or spend on other things every single month. 

Consider starting a business, or “side hustle”

Starting a business doesn’t have to be that big of a deal. You don’t have to open a store or start a restaurant. And you don’t have to invest a lot of money.

I’ve been a serial entrepreneur since 2015. My first business was selling a product on Amazon. The total start-up cost was about $2,000.

And you can certainly do it for less. A business can be as simple as a website/blog, like the guitar website I started earlier this year.  

The best part?

Once you start your own business, a lot of things that you couldn’t write off for taxes before, now you can like certain trips, office supplies, computers, etc. 

So having a business can save you a ton of money, even before you make any money from your business.

Avoid the hedonic treadmill.

You know how when you want something, and then you get it, pretty soon you want even more?

That’s the hedonic treadmill. Hedonic refers to pleasure, and the treadmill means you keep going and going, trying to get more things.

For most people, this is a continuous cycle throughout life. But it doesn’t have to be.  

The solution?

Instead of always wanting more things, spend some time learning to be grateful for what you already have. All it takes is a shift in your mindset.  

Don’t try to keep up with the Joneses.

I work with a lot of rich doctors, and most of them seem to care a lot about status symbols.

They have expensive houses, expensive cars, and expensive lifestyles.

Ultimately, it takes a lot of work to keep up with all that expense! They make a lot of money so they can spend a lot of money.

If they spent a little bit less money, they wouldn’t have to work so hard.

My income is less than half what those doctors make, but my expenses are also much lower.  

I own a modest condo, and I still drive a ’94 Camry with over 300K miles on it.  

If you can teach yourself not to care about status symbols, you can save a lot of money. You also won’t have to work nearly as hard!

Put your investing on autopilot.

This one’s pretty simple.

Sign up for automatic monthly payroll deductions to contribute to your 401k (or a similar retirement account).

Basically, as long as it happens automatically, you won’t really miss the money.  

But If you get your paycheck first and then decide how much to set aside…well, it doesn’t work nearly as well.

Choose a number between 10% and 20% for your contribution. Then set it and forget it.

That’s what I’ve been doing for the last several years, and it works great.

Prioritize experiences over things

Next time you have the choice between getting more things or having a cool experience, choose the experience.

Planning cool experiences (like travel) gives you fun anticipation beforehand and fun memories afterward.

You don’t get nearly as much satisfaction from buying new things. Basically, they’re fun for a few days, and then the novelty wears off.

I don’t buy a lot of new things, but I travel a lot. It gives me constant stuff to look forward to and great memories (and great conversation) afterwards.

Ronald Reagan once said: “Money can’t buy happiness, but it will certainly get you a better class of memories”.

Latest posts by Ben Tanner (see all)